Violent Loss Resources Newsletter, September 1, 2016

            Topic of the Month:  Prosecuting the Case, Continued

            Question of the Month: What happened in your case?

            News: National Day for Remembering Homicide Victims

            Resource of the Month

            Inspiration



Topic of the Month:
Prosecuting the case, Chapter Seven, Murder Survivor’s Handbook.

webMurder_Survivor-front-cover-sticker-2500webWhile there are many families who do get their case heard in a court of law; there are those who are still waiting for their day in court. This newsletter will address cold cases in the future. In this issue we will focus on those who do get to go to court.  The following is an excerpt from the book:

Prosecutor Prior writes the following questions on the back of her business card and encourages families to ask the questions each time they meet:

When is the next court date?

What can I expect?

Will anything new happen?

Is the case still going as planned?

What can I do to help?

Prior to court, I was told how I should act and dress; I was told to refrain from losing my mind and trying to kill this murderer, or at least that’s what I heard. I dressed nicely and answered the questions, but if looks could kill, I was trying . . . it didn’t work. (Kaila)

Trial Timeline

  • Pre-Trial Conferences
  • Jury Selection
  • Trial Starts
  • Opening Statements
  • State Presents Its Case
  • Defense Presents Its Case
  • Rebuttals by Prosecution and Defense
  • Closing Arguments
  • Jury Instructions
  • Verdict
  • Sentencing

 Twenty-eight years later an arrest was made. After two years of court hearings, a plea agreement was reached for 2nd degree murder. (Halia)

More Surprises:

  • Request to change the venue (location) of the trial.
  • Attempts to keep witnesses from testifying.
  • Your loved one is described in discrediting terms. This may have already happened during police interviews.
  • Disappointments can occur when the prosecutor does not take into consideration what the family wants. One mother was convinced that her son’s murder was a hate crime. She remained angry at the prosecutor for not adding this to the charges.Read much more in Murder Survivors Handbook.


Question of the Month: What happened in your cas
e? Can you relate in some way to the above excerpt? What tips do you have for others?



News: Mark your calendar.  National Day of Remembrance of Murder Victims is September 25. 
Thanks to Parents of Murder Children (POMC)  who worked to have this day every year set aside to put on different events to honor murdered loved ones. Activities encourage support for families and communities.  Check your local resources for activities in your community.

If you are in San Diego go to the link below for more information about the event.You will be given the opportunity to speak about your loved one’s life, who they were and how you would like them to be remembered. Ceremony for National Day of Remembrance for Murder Victims. Saturday, September 24 at 10 AM – 1 PM. Details: https://www.facebook.com/events/185416058528433/permalink/210963475973691/



Resource of the Month: Victims of Crime Resource Center, University of the Pacific-McGeorge School of Law, http://www.1800vivtims.org/



Inspiration: Take a look at images of previous River of Remembrance events on the Annual Day of Remembrance of Loved Ones of Murder Victims put on by Survivors of Violent Loss.



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Violent Loss Resources Team — Contact us

Connie Saindon: csaindon@svlp.org
Larry Edwards: larry@larryedwards.com

 

 

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